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Alfred Mullin was born in Preston in the April quarter of 1890 to Rose Ann Lunney (nee Mullin). Rose Ann Mullin was only just 16 years old when she married Bartholomew Lunney in Preston in 1878 and the couple had three children together, Bartholomew (1880), James Edward (1883) and Joseph (1885). However, when the 1891 Census was recorded Rose Ann Lunney, young Bartholomew, James Edward and one year old Alfred were living at 26 Sleddon Street in Preston but Rose Ann`s husband was not listed. A young man named Alfred Pickup, a 24 year old labourer was recorded as `visiting` the family at the time. Both Bartholomew and James Edward are recorded with the surname Lunney but Alfred is listed under his mother`s maiden name of Mullin.

Death records indicate that Bartholomew Lunney died in the April quarter of 1894 and not long afterwards on the 1st September 1894 Rose Ann married Alfred Pickup in St. Thomas`s Church in Preston. Rose Ann and Alfred went on to have two more sons, John (1895) and William (1898).

By 1901 Rose and Alfred seemed to be living apart, Rose Ann was in Brookfield Street in Preston with sons` James, Joseph and William and also her widowed mother Mary while Alfred was in Bradford Street in Lancaster working as a brickyard labourer. Alfred had taken two of his sons, eleven year old Alfred (Mullin) and four year old John with him and the three were boarding with John and Ann Kendall and their six year old son Robert. It seems that Alfred Pickup died in the Crown Point Hospital in Burnley in November 1902.

In the 1911 Census Rose Ann and her youngest son William were lodging at 15 Senior Street in Preston, Rose Ann was a cotton weaver. Alfred, however, seems to have disappeared without trace in this Census but in the December quarter of 1911 he married Sarah Elizabeth Foley in Preston.  In 1912 Alfred and Sarah had a daughter and named her Rose Ann Pickup Mullin (the inclusion of the surname Pickup is perhaps the first clear indication that Alfred`s father was indeed Alfred Pickup). A year later the couple had a son Bernard (1913).

Unfortunately Alfred`s service papers are missing so information on him is rather limited but a later newspaper article states that he enlisted in August 1914. At the time of his enlistment his home address was 1 Clarence Street in Preston and he had been working as a labourer for a Mr. Tomlinson in Leyland. Alfred was issued with the service number 11946 and at some point he was posted to the 6th Battalion.

After training on Salisbury Plain the Battalion was sent down to Blackdown near Aldershot. Alfred embarked at Avonmouth on the 15th June 1915 and sailed with the 6th Battalion to Gallipoli and was a member of “C” Company. Upon arrival in Gallipoli they were bivouacked at Seghir Dere in Gully Ravine before being sent to the front line to relieve the 29th Division. On the 31st July they were sent to Mudros where they remained for four days before proceeding back to Gallipoli and landing at Anzac Cove on the 4th August 1915.

Five days later on the 9th August 1915 Alfred was posted as missing after the desperate fighting at Chunuk Bair. (Read a personal account of Chunuk Bair).

A few weeks later the local paper published the following article;

11946 Private Alfred Mullin “C” Coy” 6th Battalion

In the March quarter of 1916 Alfred`s widow Sarah gave birth to the couples` third child, another daughter and she named her Kathleen.

For official purposes several months would have passed before the Military Authorities finally confirmed Alfred`s date of death as being on or since 9th August 1915. After his family received the official confirmation they had the following information published in the Preston Guardian.

“Private Alfred Mullin (26), of the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment, reported missing on August 9th 1915, during the Dardanelles operations is now officially reported to having been killed on or about that date. He enlisted in August 1914, and prior to that was employed as a labourer by Mr. Tomlinson, Leyland. He leaves a widow and three children who reside in Clarence Street, Preston”.

After the war Sarah Mullin would take receipt of Alfred`s 1915 Star, British War and Victory Medals to which he was entitled. Sarah would also have received his Memorial Plaque and Scroll in recognition of her husband`s sacrifice for his country.

Alfred`s name is recorded on the Roll of Honour in the Harris Museum in his hometown of Preston. When his relatives completed his details on the Roll of Honour card to make sure his name was included, they stated his full name as Alfred Pickup Mullin.11946 PTE ALFRED PICKUP MULLIN 6TH BN

Sarah Mullin remarried to Dominic Mulgrew in the December quarter of 1919. 2872 Private Dominic Mulgrew served with the 1st Battalion LNL and had been a prisoner of war. Sarah and Dominic went on to have three children together.

Helles Memorial

Helles Memorial

Rank: Private
Service No: 11946
Date of Death: 09/08/1915
Regiment/Service: The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment, 6th Bn.
Memorial: HELLES MEMORIAL

Janet Davis

Janet Davis

Janet Davis has been researching her family history for many years and through this she discovered many relatives who served in WW1. This interest then led Janet to do many walking the battlefield tours with her husband. In April 2013 she discovered this website and volunteered to help. Janet believes that there are lots of stories still to be told, most of them very sad but at the same time they are a fascinating insight into the men, their families, what they did and where they came from.
Janet Davis

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