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19312 PTE EDWARD HAINEYEdward Hainey was born in Walkden in 1883 and was the son of Thomas (b. 1858), a coal miner/general labourer, and Mary Ann Hainey  (b. 1860).

He first appeared on the Census in 1891 when he was living at 18 Chatsworth Street, Walkden with his parents and sistersMary Jane (b. 1888) and Lily Ann (b. 1890).

In 1901 the family were still living at the same address and Edward was listed as working as a cotton spinner.

Edward married Beatrice Marsh (b. 1889) on 3rd September 1910 at St Thomas’s Church, Dixon Green, Farnworth. His address at that time was given as 7 Chatsworth Street, Walkden and he was employed as a collier.

By the 1911 Census Edward was living with his wife and mother in law at 35 Bentinck Street, Farnworth. He was still working as a coal miner hewer.

Edward Hainey enlisted in the Army at Bolton and served in Gallipoli with the 6th Battalion of the Loyal North Lancashire Regimen. He died at the 15th General Hospital, Alexandria, Egypt on 29th November 1915.

He was 32 years old and was buried in the Alexandria (Chatby) Military and War Cemetery and his name is on Farnworth War Memorial in the UK.

Rank: Private
Service No: 19312
Date of Death: 29/11/1915
Regiment/Service: The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment, 6th Bn.
Cemetery: ALEXANDRIA (CHATBY) MILITARY AND WAR MEMORIAL CEMETERY

* The flexible spelling of the name ‘Hainey’ on official records made it difficult to identify a marriage for Edward’s parents. Edward’s own birth is registered as ‘Hannay’.

DBBC

This article has been reproduced with kind permission from the DBBC young roots heritage project. The young people identified and researched the the servicemen pictured in a 1916 Bolton Journal and Guardian supplement who were killed at Gallipoli. You can visit their website by clicking on the DBBC logo.
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