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JEMSONThomas Jemson was born in Preston, Lancashire in 1898 the son of Richard and Margaret Ann Jemson (nee Turner). Richard and Margaret Ann Turner were married in Preston in 1896.

Thomas was one of 7 children, the others being Winifred (1896), John (1900), Margaret Ann (1901), Mary Agnes (1905), Elizabeth (1908) and Teresa (1911).

At the time of the 1911 Census the family were living at 36 Arkwright Road, Preston. Also in the household `boarding` with the family is another lady Agnes Ellen Turner aged 54 years.

On the 16th September 1914 with a declared age of 16 years Thomas Jemson walked into the recruiting office in Preston and enlisted. He was placed in the 4th (Res) Battalion and given the service number 2595. Thomas was later allocated the number 200645.

Thomas`s medical inspection report describes him as being 5`6” tall having a 35 inch chest and being of medium physical development.

On the 9th February 1917 Thomas embarked at Folkestone and on the 3rd March 1917 he was posted to the 1/5th LNL.

Promotions followed; on the 20th September 1917 Thomas was promoted to Lance Corporal and then a couple of months later on 26th November 1917 he was further promoted to Corporal.

Thomas was granted a period of leave from 15 – 29th January 1918 and on his return from leave was then posted into `A` Coy of the 2/4th Battalion.

Thomas`s service papers record that he was reprimanded on 13th July 1918 for: “When on active service: – neglect of duty i.e. not supplying guard with rations”.

Just a few weeks later on 29th August 1918 Corporal Thomas Jemson was killed in action during the Battle of the Scarpe.

The Battalion account for the 29-30th August, 1918

Moved up to the front line, taking over from the 2/4th South Lancashire. Zero hour was 1 p.m. and our first objective was the Hendecourt-Bullecourt road, the second being Greyhound Trench. The first objective was to be taken without a barrage ; and our left flank was unprotected owing to the Canadians being 1,000 yards away. We succeeded in gaining our objective, and the battalion on our right, the 2/5th King`s Own Royal Lancaster, captured Riencourt. Our objective was taken by 2 p.m.

The Battalion held on to its objective during the night of the 29th-30th, although the enemy attacked about 12.35 p.m. on the 30th in large numbers, he was beaten off three times, suffering heavy casualties. Owing to the battalion on our right having to retire from Riencourt, we were ordered about 1.30 p.m. to withdraw to Cemetery Avenue and this line the Battalion held until relieved about 4 p.m. by the 171st Brigade, when we moved back to the support area, and the following night was passed in Tunnel Trench”

The local paper printed the following photograph and report a short while after Thomas`s death.

JEMSON1

Note: the above refers to Thomas being an apprentice at `Kick Kerr`s`, this should be `Dick Kerr`s

Thomas was awarded the British War and Victory Medals and is remembered with honour on the Vis-en-Artois Memorial.

Rank: Corporal
Service No: 200645
Date of Death: 29/08/1918
Age: 20
Regiment/Service: The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment, 2nd/4th Bn.
Memorial: VIS-EN-ARTOIS MEMORIAL

This article was researched and written by Janet Davis

Janet Davis

Janet Davis has been researching her family history for many years and through this she discovered many relatives who served in WW1. This interest then led Janet to do many walking the battlefield tours with her husband. In April 2013 she discovered this website and volunteered to help. Janet believes that there are lots of stories still to be told, most of them very sad but at the same time they are a fascinating insight into the men, their families, what they did and where they came from.
Janet Davis

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6 Responses to 200645 CPL T. JEMSON. L.N.LAN.R

  1. Mrs C Cookson says:

    This gentleman is my Great Uncle, and I have tried for years to find stuff out, as no one ever really spoke about him and all his brothers/sisters had passed away by the time I was 10 years old. I would love to finally know if he does have a grave or just the plaque and if there IS a grave, where it is, or is he one of the many with no known grave. the war graves commission says he doesn’t but some records are not always correct. this page is brilliant.

    • admin says:

      Hi, thanks for your message and glad you found our page about your Gt Uncle. Unfortunately his final resting place was unknown, as such his name listed on the Vis-en-Artois Memorial, Panel 7.

      Regards,
      Paul

  2. R. Newsham says:

    My great uncle also …. My mum (Margaret) is the daughter of Winifred. 36 Arkwright Rd is still in the family. Lovely to read this bit of family history.

  3. Catherine Martland says:

    Wow, how are you related to Thomas, mrs Cookson?

  4. colleen says:

    My dad Colin (brother of Margaret) was his nephew. Winifred, Thomas’ sister was my Grandmother.

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