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Joseph Garlick was born on the 24 September, 1890 in Preston the son of George William and Isabella Garlick (nee Westhead). George Garlick was originally from Sheffield in Yorkshire and Isabella was born in Kirkham.

Joseph`s mother Isabella had spent the early part of her life in the workhouse in Kirkham and then went to live with an uncle in Barrow and this was where she met George a man who was about twelve years older than her. The couple returned to Kirkham and married on the 26 March, 1887 at St. Michael`s Parish Church.

Joseph`s parents seem to have moved around quite a lot, after starting their married life in Kirkham they moved to Preston and then Blackpool before finally settling in Kirkham again. George Garlick was a general labourer so he may have been moving around in search of work. They appear to have had at least eight children but it seems only four of them lived.

  • George (1888-1888) born in Kirkham
  • Clara (1889) born in Kirkham
  • Joseph* (1890) born in Preston
  • Jane (1894-1894) born in Preston
  • Emma (1895) born in Blackpool
  • John Thomas (1902-1902) born in Kirkham
  • Edward (1903-1904) born in Kirkham
  • William (1905) born in Kirkham

By 1911 George Garlick was living at 45 Marsden Street in Kirkham and he had Joseph, Clara, Emma and William with him but his wife Isabella was not there. Further research reveals that in 1911 Isabella was living in a lodging house in Bolton and listed alongside her is a widower named James Livingstone who was also from Kirkham, he was about four years older than Isabella.

Joseph married Nancy Jane Danson in Christ Church in Wesham in 1914 and the same year they had a son and named him George William after his grandfather. After they married Joseph and Nancy went to live at number 5 West View in Wesham and at the time Joseph was working in Bowdlers Cotton Mill as a spinner.

At some point after war was declared Joseph enlisted into the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment and on the 14th November, 1915 he sailed to the Dardanelles to join the 6th Battalion, who had landed at Anzac Cove on Gallipoli peninsula some three months earlier. By the 20th December, 1915 the Battalion was withdrawn to Egypt (via Mudros). They were for a short time involved in the canal defence work at Port Said before being ordered to Mesopotamia, sailing on the 13th February on board the ship `Corsican`.

Sadly, Joseph was killed on the 27th April 1916 when the Battalion were in action during the relief of Kut.

The Preston Guardian later printed the following article.

Garlick

Unfortunately Joseph`s service papers have not survived so no further information is available.

Joseph was awarded the 1915 Star, British War and Victory Medals. As his body was never recovered from the battlefield Joseph is remembered on the Basra Memorial. His name is also on two local war memorials, one in Kirkham and also the memorial in the centre of Wesham.

Nancy Jane Garlick later remarried to Herbert Hartley in Emmanuel Church in Preston in 1918.

Joseph and Nancy Jane`s only son enlisted and served in WW2 as 3715928 Trooper George William Garlick of the Royal Armoured Corps, 13/18th Royal Hussars. Sadly George William also died in the service of his country on the 13 June, 1941. He died in Northamptonshire and was buried in Christ Church graveyard in Wesham the same church where his parents had married. George was just 27 years old and only one year older than his father when he died.

weshamwmGarlick 2


Rank: Lance Corporal
Service No: 20981
Date of Death: 27/04/1916
Regiment/Service: The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment, 6th Bn.
Memorial: BASRA MEMORIAL

Janet Davis

Janet Davis

Janet Davis has been researching her family history for many years and through this she discovered many relatives who served in WW1. This interest then led Janet to do many walking the battlefield tours with her husband. In April 2013 she discovered this website and volunteered to help. Janet believes that there are lots of stories still to be told, most of them very sad but at the same time they are a fascinating insight into the men, their families, what they did and where they came from.
Janet Davis

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