Looking for soldiers that served prior to WW1? Find My Past is the best resource for finding information about Victorian-era Soldiers.
By far the best resource for WW1 research. WW1 Service Records, pension papers, medal index cards and casualty information.
Search through millions of archived British Newspaper Articles to find any references to your ancestors.
loveday2

George Leonard Loveday

George Leonard Loveday was born in Bolton in 1887. He was the son of Samuel James Loveday (1856 – 1910) and Maria Cooke (1856 – 1939).

On 1st March 1910 he married Lily Boardman and they set up home together at 1 Oxford Grove, Bolton. The couple had three sons; James Leonard Loveday (1911 – 1970), Herbert Loveday (1913 – 2002) and George Arthur Loveday (1914 – 2005). They later moved to 13, Kendal Road, Bolton.

When War broke out in August 1914, George enlisted in the Army and served with the 9th (Service) Battalion of the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment with the number 24567. He had previously been employed as a stationary engine tenter at an electricity works.

George arrived in France sometime after January 1916 and was sadly killed in action later that year, on 21st October 1916.

loveday1

George’s wallet that he personalised whilst training with the 11th Battalion in the UK

Extracts from the Battalion War Diary explain the action on the day Private Loveday was killed;

20th October 1916 – Hessian Trench

The Company detailed to stay in Hessian Trench was relieved and went back into the support trenches. The evening of the 20th the Battalion again moved up to Hessian Trench, one Company being in the Assembly Trench. 2nd Lieutenant Henry Lewis being wounded during the relief, he remained on duty in the trenches until the following day. 2nd Lieutenant James Patterson Oliver wounded and evacuated to hospital.

21st October 1916 – Hessian Trench

At 12 – 6pm the artillery barrage opened. The Battalion got out of Hessian Trench in three lines and crossed ‘no-mans land’ immediately behind the barrage, very few casualties occurring until we reached the enemy’s wire, when a considerable amount of trouble was caused from an enemy machine gun and snipers.

This machine gun was outside a dugout in the sunken road and was put out of action by 2nd Lieutenant Gwynne Mervyn Jones and three bombers, the machine gun being captured. Many prisoners were taken chiefly from the sunken road dugouts, not many of the enemy being in the front line. About 200 prisoners were taken, including one officer who said that he was a Battalion Commander.

2nd Lieutenants George Charles Tiley and John Ernest Motherwell were killed in action.

As soon as they had taken the trench the men did remarkably good work consolidating, and an out post line was immediately organised and put out by 2nd Lieutenant Gwynne Mervyn Jones.

2nd Lieutenants Henry Dobbyn and William Laban Kirkham (R.W.K Regt.) wounded by shell and admitted to hospital.

Casualties on 21st October; Officers: 2 killed, 3 wounded. Other Ranks: 20 killed, 57 wounded, 17 missing.

 

loveday3

George, Lily and their three sons

George Leonard Loveday was buried at Serre Road Cemetery No. 2.

LOVEDAYcwgc

CWGC headstone photo taken in October 2014

Rank: Private
Service No: 24567
Date of Death: 21/10/1916
Age: 29
Regiment/Service: The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment 9th Bn.
Cemetery: SERRE ROAD CEMETERY No.2

Unfortunately his service papers appear not to have survived.

Paul McCormick
Contact me

Paul McCormick

Paul McCormick is the creator and administrator for the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment website. Since 2010 he has been researching the soldiers that served during the First World War and sharing their stories on his website. You can contact Paul through the website 'Contact Me' page or on Twitter and Facebook.
Paul McCormick
Contact me

Latest posts by Paul McCormick (see all)

(This post has been visited 301 times in the last 90 days)

2 Responses to 24567 PTE. G. L. LOVEDAY. L.N.LAN.R

  1. Marcus Stott says:

    George Loveday was my great grandfather on my mother’s side. Thank you for looking into his service and telling his story.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Set your Twitter account name in your settings to use the TwitterBar Section.
%d bloggers like this:

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close