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Private Michael Winn

Civilian Occupation: Cowling Spinning Mill Companyimage

Michael Winn was 26 when he died at Carnoy on 4/10/1916.

His sacrifice is recalled at the CARNOY MILITARY CEMETERY and he is recorded in the Chorley Memorial Album in Astley Hall on page CMB/II/23b. He attended Sacred Heart, Chorley.

Notes of his life and service include:

Served on the Battle Fronts in France and Belgium, and was wounded. Died 4th October, 1916. Buried in Carnog [Carnoy] Military Cemetery, one and a half miles west of Maricourt, three-and-three quarters miles N.E. of Bray-Sur-le-Somme. [sic]

CWGC and CMB have his date of death as 4/10/1916 but in fact it was in the morning of 3/10/1916, after 7 a.m.

Chorley Guardian photograph of 28/10/1916 spells name as “Wynne” and adds age, occupation and address as 23, Brook Street.

The CWGC spells his name as “Winn”. Cemetery details narrow place of death with additional detail: “The cemetery was begun in August, 1915, by the 2nd King’s Own Scottish Borderers and the 2nd King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, when the village was immediately South of the British front line. It continued in use by troops holding this sector until July, 1916, when Field Ambulances came up and a camp was established on the higher ground North of the village. It was closed in March, 1917.”

The Register of Soldiers’ Effects has his sole legatee as his sister, Miss Margaret Winn. It confirms his date of death but only locates the event, generally, in France. His sister’s signature is given on the receipts for his medals in September and December 1920, and the September receipt still has 23 Brook Street added below the signature, as does the form ensuring personal effects are to be sent to his sister. She received 1 identity disc and 1 photograph but queried that “I think he should have one more relicks.”

His Service Record has survived and has his address at Attestation as 23 Brook Street, Chorley. He Attested on 30/12/1914.

His death precipitated a court of enquiry. which was prompted to begin from 22/10/1916. There was a matter of doubt as to whether he hadd died of wounds or of natureal causes. He was absent from the battalion at the time. The on 1/11/1916 (they spelt his name as “Wynn”. Evidence was supplied by 2nd Lt J.F. Walmsley who was awakened in the vicinity of Montauban at 7 a.m. Winn (also splet Wynn in the statement) was in a bad state in a dugout. He was brought out and was lying on a ground sheet. It was suggested that the cause of death was probably alcoholic poisoning, he had been supplied with a small flask of rum before his death. The men in the dugout noted he went to sleep directly and was snoring heavily and moving abour restlessly. A second witness suggested it was about 1/4 of a pint of rum.

The decision of the court of enquiry was that there was not sufficient evidence to prove his death was caused by other than natural causes.

The 1911 Census has him as Wynn [sic] at 14 Brook Street, Chorley: Maragret Wynn (31, Head, Card Room, Rover, Cotton Industry, Born in Chorley), Margaret Ann Wynn (29, Sister, Card Room, Roverm Cotton Industry, Born in Chorley), Kathleen Wynn (27, Sister, Card Room, Rover, Cotton Industry, Born in Chorley), Francis Wynn (26, Brother, Labourer, Fittter, L & Y Railway Locomotive Works, Born in Chorley), Michael Wynn (23, Brother, Dodger, Labourer, Bleach Works, Calico Bleach Works, Born in Chorley), John Wynn (21, Brother, Dodger, Labourer, Bleach Works, Calico Bleach Works, Born in Chorley), Elizabeth Wynn (16, Sister, Card Room, Rover, Cotton Industry, Born in Chorley).

The 1901 Census has him as Winn [sic] at 2 Aldred Street, Chorley: Maragret Winn (25, Head, Cotton Card Room Hand, Born in Chorley), Mary A Winn (23, Sister, Cotton Card Room Hand, Born in Chorley), Catherine Winn (17, Sister, Cotton Card Room Hand, Born in Chorley), Francis Winn (15, Brother, Moulder’s Apprentice at Iron Shafting and Grinder Maker, Born in Chorley), Michael Winnn (11, Brother, Born in Chorley), John Winn (9, Brother, Born in Chorley), Elizabeth Winn (6, Sister, Born in Chorley), James McHugh (29, Boarder, General Labourer, Born in Chorley).

The 1891 Census has him as Winn [sic] at 5 Cumberland Street, Chorley: Michael Winn (38, Head, Bricklayer’s Labourer, Born in County Leitrim, Ireland), Catherine Winn (34, Wife, Rover in Cotton Mill, Born in County Leitrim, Ireland), Maragret Winn (14, Daughter, Born in Chorley), Mary Ann Winn (12, Daughter, Born in Chorley), Peter Winn (9, Son, Born in Chorley), Catherine Winn (6, Daughter, Born in Chorley), Frank Winn (4, Son, Born in Chorley), Michael Winnn (2, Son, Born in Chorley).

In 1881 the family were at 1 castle Street, Chorley. Michael’s father, Michael senoir, was a plasterer’s apprentice.

Michael Wynn [sic] married Catherine McPartlin by Registrar in Chorley in 1876.

Photo by Janet Davis – July 2016

Photo by Janet Davis – July 2016

Adam Cree
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Adam Cree

Adam Cree has been a History teacher since 1992. He has been cataloguing and researching the Chorley Memorial Album of Astley Hall and its compiler, Susannah Knight since 2006. As a consequence he has developed a growing interest in the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment. Adam is keen to understand the context of the communities which these men came from. He tries to explore the family relationships, friendships and connections that make them a part of the past and the present.
Adam Cree
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