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Hannescamps, 1915.

B Company Trenches 56 – 58 (inclusive)
A Company Trenches 59 – 61 (inclusive)
C Company Trenches 62- 65 (inclusive)
D Company Trenches 66 – 68 (inclusive)

Illustration by Captain Desmond Coke, Adjutant, 10th Battalion

 

 

 

Paul McCormick
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Paul McCormick

Paul McCormick is the creator and administrator for the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment website. Since 2010 he has been researching the soldiers that served during the First World War and sharing their stories on his website. You can contact Paul through the website 'Contact Me' page or on Twitter and Facebook.
Paul McCormick
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3 Responses to Map: 10th Bn: Trenches at Hannescamps

  1. […] four companies went into the firing line (shown on the attached rough plan) and were disposed as […]

  2. […] The Battalion relieved the 13th Kings Royal Rifles, the first platoon entering at 18:00hrs and the relief being completed by 19:35hrs. The relief was effected without casualties and the night passed quietly except that snipers were found to be more active than during our last period in the trenches: especially in No. 4 (D) Company sector (trenches 66 – 68) […]

    • Martin Smith says:

      My grandfather, Sgnt Walter Alfred Smith 1583, was part of a patrol of 2 NCO’s and 35 men and 2nd Lt. Lloyd. They set out at 6pm, repairing wire to the N listening post of T59. They were suddenly challenged in German, a red light went up and fire was opened and “bombs thrown by the enemy estimated at about 80 men.” This took place on 3rd November 1915 ay Hannerscamps. 2nd Lt Lloyd was thrown to the ground and dazed by a bomb whilst his sergeant was severely wounded in the eyes.
      By the 14th November Walter has been transferred to hospital in Harrogate but there is no chance of sight recovery in the right eye and is discharged on 18th August 1916.
      Walter, born in Liverpool in 1891 starts his working life as a Bell Boy on the “Lake Manitoba” out of Liverpool for Montreal and up to the outbreak of the War works in the Merchant Navy as a Steward. He signs on in 1910 as a Reserve. After the War he works in hotel management in England and Canada until his death in Leeds in 1937. He left a wife and one daughter.

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